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Nectar Feeder | Topflite

Description

New Design. Looking to attract tuis, bellbirds and waxeyes to your garden?

Yes, feed native NZ birds safely with Topflite’s purpose-designed Nectar Feeder. Expect visits from tūī, bellbird and waxeyes, if present.

New Zealand birds are quirky and colourful. They also have unique feeding needs. Topflite has designed a Nectar Feeder that serves native garden birds safely and is super-easy to clean and refill.

This design keeps feathers and droppings well clear of food with its wide, thin perching ring and the red colour of the base mimics native flowers to help birds find it easily. A removable insect cap keeps bees from taking a dive and small feeding holes for fine, tapered beaks make sure it’s just tūī, bellbirds and waxeyes who are invited to feed.

Best of all, hygiene is made easy with a glass bottle and sturdy base that are both dishwasher safe.

  • Strong enough to handle a hefty tūī or three
  • Easy to use – just fill and screw on the base
  • Includes a sample-size sachet of nectar
  • Attracts tūī, bellbirds and waxeyes, if present
  • Bee friendly

Set-up Instructions:  
Unscrew the glass bottle and fill it with water, sugar water or Topflite Wild Bird Nectar mix.  Screw into the base firmly but gently.  Avoid over-tightening the bottle in the feeder base thread.  The best ratio for feeding is one part sugar or Topflite Wild Bird Nectar to four parts water.  Throw out any liquid not consumed after 3 days to avoid it fermenting.  Dirty bird feeders are dangerous to bird populations as they can spread pathogens: thoroughly clean the feeder with gentle soap and warm water before every refill, or run it through the dishwasher.

Feeding Guide: 
Place the feeder high and out of predators’ reach but close to native trees and shrubs (where possible)—place it near other wild bird food sources.  Larger native birds are more likely to visit a feeder already in use by their smaller feathered friends.  Where possible, plant native shrubs as long-term sources of natural nectar and berries.

Dimensions: 29cm x 25cm x 25cm

Frequently Asked Questions

1) Does nectar in bird feeders go stale or ferment?
Yes, it does. While we humans are partial to the odd fermented beverage, old sugar water or nectar is not good for birds. Leftover nectar or sugar water should be drained from the feeder after 2 - 3 days, and the feeder should be thoroughly cleaned to prevent bacterial growth.

2) Should I use white or brown sugar for feeding native birds?
We recommend white or raw sugar. There is no scientific consensus that brown sugar offers benefits over and above white sugar, and equally, there’s no evidence it does any harm. We use raw sugar in our Wild Bird Nectar because it’s minimally processed and provides the golden colour that we know helps birds to locate a food source.

3) What ratio of sugar to water should I use in my nectar feeder?
Manaaki Whenua and other researchers recommend a sugar concentration of around 20% (one cup of sugar per litre of water) This mimics the sugar concentration of natural plant nectar consumed by New Zealand nectar-sipping birds.

Nectar Feeder | Topflite

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$39.95 Incl. GST

New Design. Looking to attract tuis, bellbirds and waxeyes to your garden? Yes, feed native NZ birds safely with Topflite’s... Read more

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          Description

          New Design. Looking to attract tuis, bellbirds and waxeyes to your garden?

          Yes, feed native NZ birds safely with Topflite’s purpose-designed Nectar Feeder. Expect visits from tūī, bellbird and waxeyes, if present.

          New Zealand birds are quirky and colourful. They also have unique feeding needs. Topflite has designed a Nectar Feeder that serves native garden birds safely and is super-easy to clean and refill.

          This design keeps feathers and droppings well clear of food with its wide, thin perching ring and the red colour of the base mimics native flowers to help birds find it easily. A removable insect cap keeps bees from taking a dive and small feeding holes for fine, tapered beaks make sure it’s just tūī, bellbirds and waxeyes who are invited to feed.

          Best of all, hygiene is made easy with a glass bottle and sturdy base that are both dishwasher safe.

          • Strong enough to handle a hefty tūī or three
          • Easy to use – just fill and screw on the base
          • Includes a sample-size sachet of nectar
          • Attracts tūī, bellbirds and waxeyes, if present
          • Bee friendly

          Set-up Instructions:  
          Unscrew the glass bottle and fill it with water, sugar water or Topflite Wild Bird Nectar mix.  Screw into the base firmly but gently.  Avoid over-tightening the bottle in the feeder base thread.  The best ratio for feeding is one part sugar or Topflite Wild Bird Nectar to four parts water.  Throw out any liquid not consumed after 3 days to avoid it fermenting.  Dirty bird feeders are dangerous to bird populations as they can spread pathogens: thoroughly clean the feeder with gentle soap and warm water before every refill, or run it through the dishwasher.

          Feeding Guide: 
          Place the feeder high and out of predators’ reach but close to native trees and shrubs (where possible)—place it near other wild bird food sources.  Larger native birds are more likely to visit a feeder already in use by their smaller feathered friends.  Where possible, plant native shrubs as long-term sources of natural nectar and berries.

          Dimensions: 29cm x 25cm x 25cm

          Frequently Asked Questions

          1) Does nectar in bird feeders go stale or ferment?
          Yes, it does. While we humans are partial to the odd fermented beverage, old sugar water or nectar is not good for birds. Leftover nectar or sugar water should be drained from the feeder after 2 - 3 days, and the feeder should be thoroughly cleaned to prevent bacterial growth.

          2) Should I use white or brown sugar for feeding native birds?
          We recommend white or raw sugar. There is no scientific consensus that brown sugar offers benefits over and above white sugar, and equally, there’s no evidence it does any harm. We use raw sugar in our Wild Bird Nectar because it’s minimally processed and provides the golden colour that we know helps birds to locate a food source.

          3) What ratio of sugar to water should I use in my nectar feeder?
          Manaaki Whenua and other researchers recommend a sugar concentration of around 20% (one cup of sugar per litre of water) This mimics the sugar concentration of natural plant nectar consumed by New Zealand nectar-sipping birds.

          Customer Reviews

          Based on 5 reviews
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          J
          Jenette C.
          Bird Bar

          The feeder is easy to fill, easy to hang and it is attracting many tuis and tauhou. Good investment

          R
          Ros Squire
          Great service

          Quick delivery and friendly service

          M
          Murray Dibley
          Necta Nutra Feeder

          On the very first day we put this up we have had tuis and wax eyes feeding from it. We love it, and love how close the birds are happy for us to be. Luckily it is nice and high. I would definitely recommend! 😊

          L
          Laurie Jarrett
          The Tui 'Gateway to heaven"

          We needed a bird feeder that didn't attract sparrows and other pest birds. Bought this nectar feeder from Appletons, assembled it, filled it with topflight mixture and 2 tui were on the table drinking in about 10 minutes. Result, a lot less sparrows and blackbirds, no birdshit everywhere, win win!!

          J
          James Chapman
          QTReview

          Very quick delivery;great service.

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